Can't Get It Outta My Head

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                A Baby Boomer

 

       Muses on The Music

A (Partial) Answer to What’s New

A month ago, I blogged about new music in the rock and roll/pop genre. My conclusion then, and for years before, was that there wasn’t much being done these days that was equivalent to what was happening from the mid- to late-1950s and into the early ’70s. After a month of getting input, and paying more attention to what’s going on currently, I will stand by that statement — mostly. Still, there is some interesting stuff being done these days. The initial response to that blog came from a couple Alert Readers (again, hoping that Dave Barry hasn’t licensed that term). Bill Krueger — who of course should be alert, because we share ancestors — made the entirely practical suggestion of borrowing

Could They Be a Cult?

Unlike some members of my generation, I never belonged to a cult. But I was kind of a fan of the aqua-hued, shellfish variety. As in Blue Öyster Cult, the ’70s and on band that helped pioneer heavy metal music. Which in and of itself would not have been a selling point for me, as much as their interesting approach to song lyrics (and, to a lesser extent, packaging the rock product). Spent some time on the deck recently listening to BÖC, and that didn’t change that opinion. So let’s reflect on the roots of a band that dates back more than 50 years, and early in its career was supposed to be the American version of Black Sabbath. That ensemble was originally known as Soft White Underbelly — a

I Can’t, Really …

My last post began with the statement that the title of this blog is not a throwaway line. But the original concept of that title — conceived two years or so ago, give or take a few months — related to the fact that, though I have pursued interests in other types and genres of music, I have always come back to The Music. That is, the popular music, and rock and roll, of the 1960s and ’70s. However, as that last post noted, Can’t Get It Outta My Head also means that the lyrics and tunes of The Music are stuck inside that same brain. Like the Bruce Springsteen song that inspired that post, they immaterialize in my synapses, sometimes with reason, other times randomly. The Boss’s “For You,” wh

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