Can't Get It Outta My Head

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                A Baby Boomer

 

       Muses on The Music

Music for those 12 Days of Christmas

It’s the Seventh Day of Christmas, and your true love, and yours truly, are back with the third delivery of musical gift suggestions for the Twelve Days. (And a goose that the latter left laying on the Sixth Day: an album by the eclectic late 60s/early 70s rock band, Goose Creek Symphony.) Seven Swans a Swimming Swans are less common than geese, and so are references to the same in song. So, on the Seventh Day, your honey will have to make do with the works of Fletcher Henderson and Louis Armstrong, both among the artists on Black Swan Records, America’s first African-American-owned recording company; “At the Drop of a Hat” by Flanders and Swann, the British comedy duo; "I Can Help,” Billy S

Music for Those 12 Days of Christmas

In tune with the season, and that traditional English Christmas song, I (and your true love) continue bringing to you musical gift suggestions for the 12 days of Christmas, resuming with the Third Day of Christnas, which today is. It’s the second of four deliveries he/she and I will be making. But, unlike the traditional song, this won’t be cumulative — you won’t be getting a partridge and a pear tree all 12 days. Not to mention all those geese and hens and swans, etc. Three French Hens On the Third Day, the easy way out would be bringing albums by Brigitte Bardot (yes, she had other attributes), Celine Dion and Edith Piaf — but that would be implying that those French (-Canadian, in one cas

Music for those 12 Days of Christmas

In tune with the season, and that traditional English Christmas song, over the next couple weeks I (and your true love) will bring to you musical gift suggestions for the 12 days of Christmas — which, FYI, start on the holiday itself and end on Jan. 6, the Feast of the Epiphany. We will bring you the presents in four batches, starting today; like Brown and USPS, we don’t deliver on holidays. So, you can rattle the box, but Do Not Open till Christmas!. Unlike the traditional song, this won’t be cumulative — you won’t be getting a partridge and a pear tree all 12 days. All the geese and hens and swans would get pretty messy — not to mention if the maids a-milking brought their cows. Worse yet,

And Then There Was P

Greg Lake left the planet last week, so now I guess that ELP is just P. ELP, of course, was Emerson Lake & Palmer, the English progressive rock group that sold umpty-million records worldwide. The E in that group, keyboard wunderkind Keith Emerson, died earlier this year. Lake was the bassist, vocalist and sometime songwriter for the band, which performed together for nine years — I thought it was longer — disbanding in 1979; he died Dec. 7 in London from cancer. Lake has an interesting backstory. A lot of the stars of the British Invasion and the U.K. blues-rock scene were from the London area, or from port cities like Liverpool and Sunderland where sailors brought in music from the U.S. an

Save “The Last Waltz” for Me

Four decades ago last month, one of the best concerts ever marked the end of a band that had a major impact on The Music. Nov. 25 was the 40th anniversary of “The Last Waltz,” the San Francisco show that concluded the Band’s career as a touring ensemble — and ended up being the last time the original group played together under that name. The star-studded concert was made into a multi-disc live album, and a Martin Scorsese motion picture that is considered by many to be the finest concert film ever. The Band was one of those groups that Madison's WIBA-FM, during its early days, in the fall of 1969, turned me on to. I purchased their second, self-titled album as a result; about the same time,

More New Old Music

I added to my music library a week or so ago, taking advantage of an iTunes Store special on classic rock albums, via two of the three types of purchases I detailed in a May post on this blog. Falling under The Road Less Travelled heading — works of artists and groups whose music I have little or none of — was “Liege and Lief” by Fairport Convention. I was Filling in the Corners with the Rolling Stones’ “Some Girls” and “Brothers in Arms” by Dire Straits, both bands that I own several albums by, but want to expand or complete my collections of. Fairport had always intrigued me, perhaps for the same reason that the Incredible String Band and Jethro Tull did — there’s a lot of English in my b

Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us